DTP is calling for applications for its 27th Annual Human Rights and People’s Diplomacy Training Program for Human Rights Defenders from the Asia-Pacific Region and Indigenous Australia.

See Brochure, See Application Form

To mark the 10th Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples [UNDRIP], DTP and the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) are delivering a capacity building program on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (21-25 June 2017, Thailand).

For more info

DTP with MFA, Bar Council Migrants, Refugees and Immigration Affairs Committee (MRIAC), North South Initiative (NSI) and Migration Working Group (MWG) organised module-2 of the “Advocating for the Rights of Migrant Workers in Malaysia” from 2-5 June 2017. 

For more info

DTP, MFA and GUQ continued the efforts and collaboration to promote respect for the rights of migrant workers in the GCC and Middle East. A 5-day regional training course was held in Qatar from 21st – 25th May 2017.

For more info

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The Diplomacy Training Program – Making a Difference for Human Rights

The Diplomacy Training Program (DTP) is an independent, Australian NGO committed to advancing human rights and empowering civil society in the Asia Pacific region through quality education and training, and the building of skills and capacity in non-governmental organisations and for individual human rights defenders and community advocates.

The DTP was founded in 1989 by HE José Ramos-Horta, 1996 Nobel Peace Laureate and former President of Timor-Leste with Emeritus Professor Garth Nettheim.

Since January 1990, the DTP has provided practical human rights training to over 2800 human rights defenders and community advocates in the Asia-Pacific Region.

It's practical, participatory courses develop the knowledge, networks and skills for human rights defenders in Australia, Asia and the Pacific to help them be more effective in making a difference for human rights. See Stories of Change - from DTP's alumni

Background to DTP (Made in 1992)

 

 

Discussion about Human Rights in Malaysia with Executive Director of (SUARAM), Sevan Doraisamy (13 June 2017)

The DTP was delighted to welcome Sevan Doraisamy, the Executive Director of Suara Rakyat Malaysia (SUARAM). Members and friends of the DTP, UNSW staff and students, and other organisations (Australian Pro Bono Centre and Amnesty International Australia) attended an engaging discussion about human rights in Malaysia.

Sevan gave a thorough insight into the issue of Detention without Trial in Malaysia, discussing the impact of national security legalisation. An open floor discussion raised concerns of Malaysia’s security and terrorism laws towards its citizens and human right defenders. Sevan emphasised that Freedom of Expression and Economic, Social and Cultural rights were the two main laws that currently affect human right defenders in Malaysia.

Sevan also made a guest appearance on the ABC Radio National Breakfast Show on Thursday 15 June 2017. The talk discussed the concern of enforced disappearances in Malaysia, shedding light on the recent abductions of four people. Sevan predicted that an increasing number of groups in Malaysia are openly expressing religious intolerance. He indicated the importance of government authorities and the police to take responsibility for the recent abductions.

 

Leaving No One Behind (June 2017)

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Location: Chiang Mai

Program Dates: 21st June – 25th June 2017 

 To mark the 10th Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples [UNDRIP], DTP and the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) are delivering a capacity building program on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (21-25 June 2017, Thailand).

On the 25th of September 2015, the 193 member countries of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda – a new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved by 2030.   The commitment to ‘leave no one behind’ and ‘reach the furthest behind first’ are particularly relevant to Indigenous peoples. The SDGs commit national governments,

….  to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and amongcountries; to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies; to protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources.  

This special program aims to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and will build the capacity of Indigenous peoples’ organisations and their representatives to use UNDRIP as they engage with governments and the private sector in SDGs planning and programming.

[Photo above] Joan Carling, co-convenor of the Global Indigenous Peoples Major Group on the Sustainable Development Goals, teaching on the DTP program 'The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development' held in partnership with AIPP in Chiang Mai. 

 

 [Photo above] Raja Devasish Roy, Member of United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues Chief of Chakma Circle

Human Rights Advocacy and Migrant Workers in the Middle East (May 2017)

Location: Doha, Qatar

Program Dates: May 21st - May 25th 2017

The Diplomacy Training Program (DTP) and Migrant Forum Asia (MFA) held a regional training course on human rights advocacy and migrant workers in the Middle East. This training program took place over 5 days in Qatar from 21st – 25th May 2017, hosted by Georgetown University Qatar (GUQ). DTP, MFA and GUQ continued the efforts and collaboration to promote respect for the rights of migrant workers in the GCC and Middle East. 

 The objective of the program was to build the knowledge and skills to protect and promote the human rights of migrant workers, and to enable participants to more effectively use internationally agreed standards and mechanisms in their advocacy for the human rights of migrant workers in the Middle East.  The program also provided a valuable forum for the sharing of knowledge and skills, and for the building of support networks and collaboration between countries of origin and destination.

The treatment of migrant workers is one of the key human rights challenges of the region and the 21st Century.  Rapid economic change is driving more people to cross borders in search of decent work.  Migrant workers are subject to discrimination, unsafe and unhealthy working conditions, non-payment of wages violence and detention.   In many cases, migrant workers are forced to live on the fringes of society, beyond the usual protection of the law.  Effective advocacy is vital to narrowing the gap between internationally accepted standards and the real-life experiences of many migrant workers.  The program assisted participants to work together in developing practical strategies to protect and promote migrant workers’ rights at the national and regional level.

The program brought together 26 participants from 10 countries – including Lebanon, Qatar, Kuwait, Jordan, UAE, Bahrain, Nepal, India, Bangladesh, and the Philippines– working with trade unions, NGOs, private sector, media, and migrant communities. There were sessions with William Gois (MFA), Professor Ray Jureidini, author of the ILO White Paper on reforming recruitment, Mariam Bhacker, Project Manager BHRRC, and Rawan Damen, a filmmaker and media consultant. The program built the knowledge, skills and networks of participants and the feedback was very positive.

See ScheduleParticipants' Biographies

2017 Advocating for the Rights of Migrant Workers in Malaysia [March - December 2017 (5 Modules)]

2nd Module: 2nd June - 5th June 2017

Diplomacy Training Program (DTP) in partnership with Migrant Forum in Asia (MFA) Bar Council Migrants, Refugees and Immigration Affairs Committee (MRIAC), North South Initiative (NSI) and Migration Working Group (MWG) organised module-2 of the “Advocating for the Rights of Migrant Workers in Malaysia” from 2-5 June 2017.

The yearlong program is designed to build knowledge, skills and networks to enhance and support civil society advocacy for the promotion and protection of migrant workers’ rights in Malaysia. The program brings together Malaysian advocates with advocates from countries of origin, including Nepal, Bangladesh, Philippines, and Indonesia to build links and networks and to develop shared advocacy strategies for greater impact in Malaysia and countries of origin.

 

The program strategy forms part of DTPs broader theory of change, whereby the direct benefits of the training programs are expected to translate into more effective and strategic engagement with the international human rights system and national governments, and into more systematic participation in policy dialogues and in regional fora such as the Abu Dhabi Dialogue, the Colombo Process and ASEAN. The programs also share good practice from other countries of origin and destination, developed understanding of the situation in countries of destination and built links with NGOs and networks there.

Module – 2 of the program had a focus on case documentation/ management and organising of migrant workers. Module also included sessions on the Malaysian legal and policy framework governing migrant workers, and a practical engagement with a member of Parliament on the role of parliamentarians for the protection of the rights of migrant workers. Participants of the program revisited the issues and expectation of the program identified in module-1 and set priorities for change to develop campaigning strategy.

Resource persons for the program were Pathma Santiago – Regional Coordinator Asia Pacific at a Global Union; Apolinar Z Tolention – Regional Representative at BWI; Dato Ramachelvam Manimuthu – Chairperson at Migrants, Refugees & Immigration Affairs Committee Bar Council of Malaysia; Dr. Michael Jeyakumar Devaraj – Member of parliament; and Sahul Hamid – Vice Chairman at MTUC Penang Division.

This was the second of the five-module capacity building training program in Malaysia. The next module in August will focus on the responsibilities of private sector for the protection of the rights of migrant workers.

1st Module: 31st March – 3rd April 2017

 

Sharan Burrow (pictured above), ITUC General Secretary speaks with participants in the DTP/MFA course on the rights of migrant workers in Malaysia - organised with Malaysia Bar Council, North-South Institute and Migration Working Group.  For more information, click on this link.

2017 Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples, The Private Sector and Development (Feb - March 2017)

Location: Sabah

Program Dates: 27th February - 8th March, 2017

DTP and JOAS are collaborating with OHCR Regional Office and OHCHR Civil Society Unit on delivering a regional capacity building program on Human Rights, Indigenous peoples, the Private Sector and Development.   Twenty-four participants, mainly from Indigenous communities in Indonesia, India, Malaysia, Nepal, Myanmar, Cambodia and Bangladesh have travelled to Sabah in Malaysia to learn, share knowledge and experience.   Sabah has witnessed the dramatic impacts of deforestation, dams and plantations. The participants have been learning about relevant human rights standards, and UN human rights monitoring and accountability mechanisms that can be used to protect and promote human rights in the context of rapid economic development.   The intersection of the environment and human rights, the preservation of Indigenous languages and traditional knowledge, the diminishing space for civil society and militarization have been among the issues raised. The program is funded with support from Oxfam Australia and the Australian government and DTP’s individual supporters.